1953 Bel Air Convertible

  • Year: 1953

  • Make: Chevrolet 

  • Model: Bel Air

  • Mileage: 3,338 

  • Exterior Color: Surf Green

  • Interior Color: Green

asking $49,900 or best offer

Specs:

235 Cubic Inch 6 Cylinder

Power Glide Automatic Transmission

Factory Power Steering

Manual Drum Brakes

Vacuum Wipers

Correct Generator

Original 6 Volt Electrical System

Single Exhaust

Oil Bath Air Cleaner

Power Top

AM Pushbutton Radio

Fender Mount Antennae

Dual Outside Mirrors

Fender Skirts

Wide Whitewall Radial Tires

Clock

Under Dash Vents

Heater

Dual Sun Visors

Factory Gauges

Bumper Guards front and rear

Chrome Fuel Door Guards

Dual Horns

Tinted Windshield


The Bel Air was given a facelift in 1953. The pre-war technology, such as torque tube drive, six-cylinder splash feed engines, knee-action suspension, and split windshields of the early models was phased out and the foundations for the first post war modern Chevrolet passenger car were finalized. The Bel Air series featured a wide chrome strip of molding from the rear fender bulge to the rear bumper. The inside of this stripe was painted a coordinating color with the outside body color, and "Bel Air" scripts were added inside the strip. Lesser models had no model designation anywhere on the car, having only a Chevy crest on the hood and trunk. 1953 was the first year for a curved, one-piece windshield.

 

In the July 1953 issue of Popular Mechanics, a tested 1953 Bel Air went from 0-60 mph in 19.6 seconds.

 

Bel Air interiors had an optional massive expanse of chrome across the lower part of the dashboard (most were painted), along with a deluxe Bel Air steering wheel with full chrome horn ring. Carpeting and full wheel covers rounded out Bel Air standard equipment. 

 

During these years, there were three engine choices, depending on the transmission ordered. Both 235 cubic inch engines were "Blue Flame" inline six cylinder OHV engines, featuring hydraulic valve lifters (in 1953 with automatic transmissions) and aluminum pistons. The 106 hp (79 kW) 235 cubic inch displacement engine was standard on stickshift models, with solid lifters and splash plus pressure lubrication including babbit bearings. Powerglide cars got a 115 hp (86 kW) version which had hydraulic lifters and full pressure lubrication.

 


In 1953 and 1954, Bel Airs could be ordered in convertible, hardtop coupe, two- and four-door sedans, and, for 1954, the Beauville station wagon which featured woodgrain trim around the side windows. Many new options, once available only to more expensive luxury cars, became offered starting in 1953, including power steering and the Guidematic headlight dimmer in 1953; and power brakes, power 2-way front seat and power front windows in 1954. All 1954 models equipped with the standard transmission used the 1953 Powerglide engine.